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Rangers: Branches, Daily Life and Foregatherings

The humble Ranger doesn't get a lot of love in 5e. Which is a shame, because they really are a great role-playing class, with lots of flavor and interesting additions, if you take the time to give them the love they deserve.
2e had a great mechanic. They were called Kits, and they were roleplaying paths with some minor mechanics tacked on. They were, in short, amazing.
Let's make some NPC Rangers that aren't the same old boring thing!
So let's get cracking!

Domains

Rangers generally only cover one or two types of terrain their whole lives, and usually just one. If you want an idea of the types of domains they can live in, please check out this post.

Ranger Kits

  • BEASTMASTER - A wanderer, the Beastmaster has a natural affinity for animals; in fact, he has a limited form of telepathic communication with them. This is often the result of a magical bond with the Animal Kingdom, formed either at the time of his birth or upon reaching young adulthood. Unlike other adventurers, the Beastmaster does not command, train, or control his animal companions, rather they are his friends and comrades-in-arms. Misunderstood and feared by nobles and common folk alike for his unnatural abilities with animals, the Beastmaster seldom stays in one place for long, nor is he comfortable in civilized lands.
  • Role: Beastmasters tend to walk alone, accompanied only by the fierce natural beasts that are their friends and allies. Traveling the fringes of settled lands, the Beastmaster has small use for the trappings of civilization, but even less for the minions of evil, particularly those of a magical or priestly nature. Thus, a Beastmaster will often find himself aiding the oppressed or enslaved, and pitted against the cruelties of evil priests or wizards and their allies.
  • EXPLORER - The restless spirit of the Explorer makes him the most nomadic of all rangers. His travels take him around the world, as he continually seeks new lands to investigate and new cultures to study. No region is too remote, no society too primitive to pique the Explorer's interest. An expert in communication, survival, and anthropology, the Explorer's skills are invaluable for safely navigating uncharted terrain and negotiating with suspicious natives.
  • Role: Motivated as much by curiosity as money, the Explorer spends more of his time planning expeditions than looking for employment. Still, Explorers are in high demand as guides, mapmakers, and scouts. A reputable Explorer can demand a high price for his services. However, rumors of a lost civilization are more likely to intrigue an Explorer than the promise of treasure, and he chooses his jobs accordingly. Though a Pathfinder (discussed elsewhere in this chapter) or similarly skilled guide plays a crucial role in leading an expedition through unexplored territory, it's often an Explorer who's actually in charge. The Explorer decides when it's best to forge ahead and when to rest. He knows that small parties travel better than large ones, as each additional member increases the likelihood of delays from injury and disease. Above all, he understands the relationship between safety and self-restraint. He discourages his companions from taking unnecessary risks whenever possible. An Explorer balances his natural impulsiveness with healthy doses of caution and common sense. More of a scholar than a brawler, he is usually a reluctant combatant, resorting to violence only when all other options fail. But when attacking, he fights with a single-mindedness that can border on savagery. A seasoned Explorer counsels his companions to follow two rules vital to wilderness survival, particularly where primitive civilizations are suspected to exist: (1) negotiating is usually preferable to attacking; and (2) if you intend to attack, then attack to kill.
  • FERALAN - What happens to children who wander into the wilderness and are never recovered? Or worse, children who are abandoned by their families, left in the woods to fend for themselves? Sadly, most of them eventually succumb to the dangers of the wild. But a fortunate few are taken in by animals, raised as part of a lion's brood or a wolf's litter. Cut off from civilization, they gradually take on the characteristics of the creatures who adopted them. In the process, they become Feralans, beings who combine the savagery of a beast with the intellect of a man. The Feralan may look like a human, but for the most part, he acts like a wild animal. He speaks the language of animals and lives in their lairs. He leads them on hunts, defends them against predators, and considers them his family. Yet, the Feralan retains vestiges of his own race, characterized by his agile mind and an unshakable curiosity about human civilization. Many Feralans have picked up enough human language to communicate with them, albeit on a limited basis. Despite his bestial tendencies, the Feralan's moral principles are not so different from other rangers. He values the well-being of his followers as much as his own. He avoids needless killing and considers himself the nemesis of hunters who stalk game for sport.Greed and jealously are as unknown to the Feralan as they are to the creatures of the forest.
  • Role: Many people fear Feralans, wrongly considering them to be ferocious wildmen or savage werecreatures. Those who befriend Feralans, however, come to know them as trustworthy, noble, and even gentle. Still, Feralans remain wary of most humans and demihumans, finding their actions unpredictable and often incomprehensible. Feralans rarely volunteer to join adventuring parties. However, because Feralans are fervent animal advocates and protectors of the wild, they are inclined to cooperate with parties who share their concerns. While a Feralan's human companions may admire his courage and respect his instincts, they may find his beast-like behavior offensive at best, frightening at worst. After a hunt, a Feralan may drag the carcass of his prey back to the party's campsite and eat it raw, tearing off chunks with his familial followers. Personal hygiene is rarely among a Feralan's priorities, though he may occasionally lick himself clean. He grooms his animal friends by picking bugs from their fur, then cuddles up with them to go to sleep. When disturbed, he may snarl like a wolf. To celebrate victory over a predator, he may howl at the moon. He communicates in grunts, growls, and sentence fragments. He may disconcert new associates by sniffing them!
  • FOREST RUNNER - Wherever a corrupt or oppressive regime holds power, there's bound to be a Forest Runner. Forest Runners rise in opposition to such regimes, living on the fringes of society, usually one step ahead of the law. They're criminals only in a technical sense, as they adhere to a personal code that compels them to wage war against greedy aristocrats and unjust rulers. While the powers-that-be view the Forest Runner as a lawless troublemaker, commoners see him as hero, perhaps their best hope against a tyrannical government. Constantly on the move, Forest Runners live by their wits and have learned to make do with minimal resources. They excel in combat and make formidable opponents. Ever active and brimming with self-confidence, Forest Runners delight in harassing authority figures, particularly the pompous and well-to-do. Many a hapless aristocrat has been left bound, gagged, and penniless after a humiliating roadside encounter with a Forest Runner.
  • Role: The Forest Runner is usually selfless, resourceful, and roguishly charming. A loner by circumstance and not by choice, a Forest Runner readily allies with adventuring parties who share his outlook. As a champion of underdogs everywhere, the Forest Runner doesn't necessarily feel bound to his homeland, and may journey anywhere in the world to promote justice. Occasionally, he may join a party to acquire treasure for distribution to the needy. If the local authorities are putting the heat on, he may accompany a party simply to disappear for a while.
  • GREENWOOD RANGER - The rarest and certainly the most unusual ranger, the Greenwood Ranger, or Limbant, combines characteristics of both humans and plants. The Greenwood Ranger begins life as a normal human, but through resolute appeals to the gods, he gradually acquires plant-like qualities that enhance his relationship with the vegetable kingdom and endow him with remarkable powers. A Greenwood Ranger resembles a normal human covered from head to toe with a layer of thick brown bark, similar to that of an oak tree. The bark on the back of his head and the backs of his hands and arms is tinged with green; the green bark enables him to absorb nutrients directly from the sunlight. He has no body hair, no teeth, and his tapering fingers and toes look like gnarled branches. Tangles of short roots grow from his feet and ankles. Aside from these physical differences, the Greenwood Ranger moves, speaks, and behaves much like an ordinary human.
  • Role: Because he must sacrifice a portion of his humanity to become a Greenwood Ranger, a human drawn to this kit usually has only a tenuous link with formal society. He is an outsider, with few close friendships or family ties, capable of walking away from the civilized world without regret. Orphans, social outcasts, and eccentric personalities are good candidates to become Greenwood Rangers. Greenwood Rangers live deep in the forest or jungle, far from urban centers. Most people tend to shun Greenwood Rangers, repulsed by their appearance or fearful of their strange powers. But their distrust is unwarranted. Greenwood Rangers are gentle-natured, thoughtful souls to whom all life is precious. A Greenwood Ranger will mourn the loss of a favorite shade tree as much as the passing of a human companion. To the Greenwood Ranger, the wilderness is a glorious, sacred place. If necessary, he will risk his life to preserve it. In most cases, a Greenwood Ranger will align with any adventuring party who shares his affinity for nature, providing he agrees with their cause. A Greenwood Ranger tends to keep to himself, offering his opinion only when asked and deferring to the party's leader in most situations.
  • GUARDIAN - The Guardian is a self-appointed protector of the wilderness. Compelled by a strong sense of duty, he has assumed responsibility for an unsettled tract of land, doing his utmost to maintain it in its natural state and protect its animal occupants. Though he feels kindly towards woodsmen, elves, and others who share his respect for nature, he has little patience for those who would exploit the wilderness for gain or spite. A Guardian constantly monitors the region he has sworn to protect. He scrutinizes the activity of strangers, advises travelers, and intercepts careless hunters. He keeps an eye out for fires, floods, and other natural disasters, and does what he can to comfort animals in times of crisis.
  • Role: A Guardian operates of his own volition, having no official sanction or title. He carries out his custodial duties as he sees fit, taking whatever steps he deems necessary to protect his domain. Despite his independence, he usually maintains good working relationships with officials of bordering lands. The relationship benefits both parties. The Guardian notifies the officials of approaching armies or other potential threats, while the officials may provide help for problems the Guardian can't handle alone. Though many governments would jump at the chance to have such able warriors in their employ, Guardians resist all such offers, and steadfastly maintain their autonomy. An adventuring party entering a Guardian's domain has a good chance of encountering the Guardian himself. A Guardian will usually agree to guide a party through his domain and--presuming the party's intentions are compatible with the Guardian's philosophy--assist them in their efforts. Though a Guardian is reluctant to leave his domain, he may do so if presented with a compelling reason, such as the ravaging of a pristine wilderness or a threat to the ecology in another land. Guardians tend to be self-sufficient, clear-headed, and conscientious. They make excellent leaders. Though a Guardian may develop deep friendships with other party members, he always parts company at the end of an adventure, returning to his domain as soon as he can.
  • MOUNTAIN MAN - Some people find the lure of the wild irresistible. Having tasted the pleasure of life in its purest, most primitive state, these hardy souls reject the trappings of civilization and wholeheartedly embrace the challenges of the untamed wilderness. These Mountain Men (and Women) spend their lives in relative isolation, enduring uncertain climates, hostile creatures, and chronic shortages of food and other vital supplies. They couldn't be happier. The typical Mountain Man is robust, courageous, and uncomplicated. Book learning and formal schooling mean far less than self-reliance and common sense. Though uneducated by conventional standards, the Mountain Man has mastered all the skills needed to survive. He can manufacture his own weapons from the crudest materials, brew potent medicines from wild herbs, and doggedly persist in strenuous physical labor when others have long since succumbed to exhaustion. While hunting wild game and navigating dangerous terrain may be daunting to an outsider, it's all in a day's work for the Mountain Man.
  • Role: Mountain Men value privacy more than comfort. Accordingly, they make their homes in secluded caves or crude shacks hidden in remote mountain ranges. Many are nomadic, wandering from place to place with their possessions strapped to their backs, or carried by a bear or other loyal animal follower. They have little need for money, but occasionally procure goods from traveling salesmen or small town merchants, bartering with fur or hides. Even the most stubbornly independent Mountain Man hankers for human companionship now and then, which is one of the reasons he might agree to hook up with an adventuring party. Faced with a problem too formidable for him to tackle alone--such as an encroachment from an enemy army or an infestation of powerful monsters--a Mountain Man may seek out an agreeable party to lend him a hand. The Mountain Man speaks his mind openly and directly, regardless of who he might offend. Etiquette is hardly his strong suit, nor is personal hygiene. While some party members may find the Mountain Man's straightforward approach to life refreshing, or even endearing, most will probably view him as an unsophisticated brute, gruff and ill-mannered. Some Mountain Men have a crude sense of humor that compels them to play adolescent practical jokes, such as leaving bear droppings in a companion's sleeping bag.The Mountain Man has little interest in art or philosophy, but is a natural storyteller and loves to tell outlandishly embellished tales--often of his own exploits. He approaches combat much as he does the other elements of his life, attacking with vigor.
  • SEA RANGER - Though most rangers live and work on land, the Sea Ranger makes his home at sea. Whether sailing the ocean in a mighty galleon or riding a river's currents in a handmade raft, the Sea Ranger finds the world's waters an endless source of wonder. A sailor and an adventurer, he guards his watery domain with vigilance, and counts many of its creatures among his friends and allies. He has an extensive understanding of weather patterns at sea and of the behavior of marine animals. He specializes in combat, both on and under the water. He may be a member of a formal navy, an independent operator, or a mercenary. He may be charged with enforcing naval laws. Some Sea Rangers protect ports or fishing territories. Others serve as escorts for trade fleets.
  • Role: Sea Rangers have reputations as dedicated, sharp-minded professionals. As such, they are often sought by adventuring parties in need of their special skills, particularly when an adventure takes them to aquatic environments or they expect to face opponents of oceanic origin. Though Sea Rangers generally prefer to remain at sea, they travel on land as necessary to achieve the goals of their party. As many of a Sea Ranger's followers are waterbound, he obviously has less access to them when adventuring on land, a handicap he endures graciously but without enthusiasm. The environment has a profound effect on a Sea Ranger's attitude. On land, his party companions will find him hesitant and uncertain, following orders without comment and reluctant to offer advice. In an aquatic setting, however, he becomes a different person--confident, assertive, and commanding. Only the most stubborn or foolish parties will decline a leadership role to a Sea Ranger in watery terrain.
  • WARDEN - The Warden works for a noble, king, or wealthy land-owner, and is charged with managing and protecting a tract of land owned by his overlord. He keeps his overlord's land free of monsters, guards against spies and trespassers, intervenes when natural disasters occur, and sees to the welfare of the animal population. While a Warden may operate alone, making decisions as he sees fit, he ultimately answers to a higher authority. Areas overseen by Wardens vary by size and geography, depending on their overlords' holdings and interests. A Warden may be in charge of a game reserve or oversee a parcel of farmland. He may supervise a private park, or be responsible for undeveloped property in the mountains or desert. The size of a guarded land may range from a few square miles for Wardens just beginning their careers, to vast estates for high level Wardens. Generally, as a Warden's experience increases, so do the boundaries of the land he supervises.
  • Role: In most societies, Wardens occupy positions of modest status, comparable to those of mid-level bureaucrats or well-to-do merchants. Some are members of the military, but more often, they're aides to government officials or affluent civilians. Wardens tend to hold the same job for life. A Warden serves his lord with the loyalty of a good soldier. He tends to be fastidious in his behavior and strictly law-abiding, which also makes him a bit inflexible. To most Wardens, rules are rules, and there's not much middle ground. When an adventuring party enters a Warden's guarded area, he may agree to assist them for the sake of expediency; the sooner the party leaves his area, the sooner things will get back to normal. Conversely, a Warden may seek out a party to help with a particularly difficult task, such as ridding the guarded area of destructive creatures or locating a treatment for a crop disease. Depending on the circumstances, a Warden may journey anywhere in the world; he is not bound to remain in his guarded area. However, a Warden will not undertake any adventure without direct orders from, or with the express permission of his overlord. Other members of an adventuring party may find a Warden to be cordial but distant. A Warden's loyalties lie primarily with his overlord, not with his companions, and this can create stress for party members who insist on comradeship. Some Wardens are also prone to homesickness; the further an expedition takes him from his guarded area, the more anxious and sullen he may become. Nevertheless, a Warden's dedication and professionalism can only enhance a party's effectiveness. Many comply unwaveringly with orders from the party leader, offer pointed advice when needed, and fight courageously on the battlefield.

Daily Life

Patrolling

The ranger spends much of his free time patrolling his territory. He may follow the same route every day, or he may wander wherever his fancy takes him. He keeps an eye out for signs of trouble, such as eroded fields or withered plants, and makes contact with other sentient residents, listening to their problems or engaging in small talk. Some rangers ride mounts, particularly if they have a lot of ground to cover, but most prefer to patrol on foot, which enables them to traverse obstacles more easily, as well as minimizing the chance of drawing attention to themselves. Though patrolling is necessary to keep abreast of the condition of their territories, rangers also patrol for the sheer pleasure of basking in the open air and savoring nature's splendor.

Monitoring Strangers

A ranger is ever-watchful for strangers in his territory. Followers or other contacts may alert him to the presence of strangers, or he may become aware of them himself by noticing disturbances in the terrain or observing them directly. In most cases, a ranger monitors strangers discretely, watching them from the cover of trees or shadows, or requesting his followers to make regular reports of their activities. Usually, a ranger can ascertain the intention of strangers without ever making direct contact with them. Most turn out to be harmless travelers or hunters who pose no threat to the ranger or his territory, and the ranger leaves them alone. If a stranger's motives are more ambiguous--for instance, if he's chopping down trees or hunting animals beyond his needs--the ranger will confront him, politely but firmly inquiring about his intentions. Generally, the abrupt appearance of an intimidating ranger, particularly if he's accompanied by a bear or two, elicits immediate cooperation. If the stranger explains himself satisfactorily, the ranger departs, perhaps implying that he'll be back if the stranger doesn't keep his nose clean. Should the stranger resist the ranger's authority, the ranger may take whatever actions he deems necessary to ensure compliance, using violence as a last resort.
However, physical confrontations are rare. More commonly, strangers require directions, medical care, or advice. A ranger is usually willing to help, especially if his assistance facilitates their leaving his territory more quickly. If the strangers are lost, the ranger will point out the best route leading to their desired destination. In some cases, he'll volunteer to guide them. Most rangers have a rudimentary knowledge of first aid, and can bind sprained ankles, splint bones, and attempt to resuscitate for drowning victims. A ranger can explain which plants are edible and which are poisonous. He can direct strangers to sources of fresh water, orchards of ripe fruit, and safe campsites. In return, the ranger may well insist that strangers clean up after themselves, avoid disturbing local habitats, and preserve the natural beauty of the environment. Those who violate the ranger's trust can expect a brisk escort out of his territory.

Trailblazing

A ranger who occupies an undeveloped wilderness must spend a fair amount of time making and maintaining trails. Some of these trails may be permanent roads or paths, usable by anyone traversing the ranger's territory. Other trails may be known only to the ranger, concealed by dense woods or similar terrain. The ranger and his followers use these concealed trails to get from place to place while monitoring the movement of strangers. Although animals in their native habitats are efficient trailmakers, the ranger may improve their trails by making the footing safer, or linking feeding grounds, watering holes, grazing pastures, and lairs. An effective trail system requires a thorough understanding of the land, including the precise location of streams, hills, and other significant terrain features. A ranger occupying a small territory may be able to hold this information in his head. For larger regions, the ranger may need to keep maps. In this case, a conscientious ranger will regularly review and update his maps, adding new features and looking for discrepancies. Constructing a new trail begins with clearing debris and smoothing the ground. This may involve cutting trees, pulling stumps, and filling in holes. If a road passes though a valley or ravine, the ranger may have to dig ditches to direct rainwater away from the trail. He may then need to plant grasses along the roadside to prevent soil from washing into the ditches.
Trail maintenance is an ongoing chore, requiring weeding in the spring and ice removal in the winter. In exceptionally harsh climates, the ranger may have to build snow fences, which are constructions of wood or stone that run parallel to a trail. During blizzards, blowing snow piles up along the fence instead of covering the trail.

Wildlife Management

A dutiful ranger looks after the interests of the wildlife in his territory. He tracks down poachers and unprincipled hunters, relocates creatures that have been displaced by natural disasters, and cares for young animals whose parents have been killed. He notes fluctuations in animal populations and tries to determine if an excess of predators (or prey) is only a temporary adjustment to current conditions, or if it foreshadows a more serious problem. A sudden drop in the number of songbirds or frogs, for instance, may indicate that the insects they eat have been poisoned by some outside source.

Conservation

A ranger is dedicated to the preservation of his environment. He uses timber, water, and other natural resources judiciously and encourages others to do the same. If he cuts a tree, he replaces it with a new seedling. If he raises herd animals, he keeps them moving so as not to overgraze a pasture. If he farms, he rotates his crops so as not to exhaust the soil, replacing the nutrients with natural fertilizers. Unfortunately, the ranger must continually struggle against the carelessness and greed of those who don't share his concerns. They strip the land of timber and minerals, and level entire forests to build new cities. For commerce or sport, they hunt scarce species to extinction. They relentlessly farm the same acreage until the soil can no longer support crops, and dump raw sewage and other waste products into lakes and rivers until the water is no longer fit to drink.
The ranger employs several methods to counter this selfishness and indifference. He educates travelers passing through his territory, demonstrating the importance of proper waste disposal and the danger of smoldering camp fires. He negotiates with local villages to regulate mining and farming, and to set aside virgin forests and jungles as protected sanctuaries. In extreme situations, a ranger may resort to guerilla tactics, such as sabotaging oppressive and ruinous activities. A ranger must also be constantly vigilant for natural disasters. As prevention is the key to effective disaster management, a ranger remains alert for the earliest signs of trouble, taking immediate steps to intervene before the problem becomes a full-blown catastrophe.
Here are some the most common natural disasters a ranger might have to face:
  • Drought. Higher than average temperatures and a lack of rainfall may result in a drought. When water is scarce, rivers dry up, vegetation withers, and animals suffer from dehydration. Rangers can't accurately predict when droughts will occur. However, in regions of irregular rainfall, he can check tree rings, which give an excellent indicator of rain received in previous seasons. Thick rings occur in wet years, thin rings in dry years. Since wet periods tend to alternate with dry periods, studying the rings can help the ranger anticipate the next drought. A ranger can't offset the overall effects of a drought, but he can reduce the local impact of the drought on marginal habitats by storing water, and encouraging others to do the same.
  • Earthquake. Violent shifting of the earth's inner layers may produce earthquakes, which can occur anywhere in the world. Earthquakes can indirectly cause flooding and fires, but the biggest danger comes from avalanches, falling rocks, trees, mudslides, and collapsing buildings. As with seacoast floods, there's not much a ranger can do to prevent earthquakes, but he can learn to recognize the signs that precede them. Unusual animal behavior (such as the agitated prancing of small mammals), spontaneous geyser eruptions, and clusters of small tremors often indicate an impending major earthquake. While the warnings may not come long in advance, a forewarned ranger can spread the word to head for plains or open fields, which may be safer havens in the event of a major earthquake.
  • Fire. Fires are perhaps the most devastating of all natural disasters. A fire not only wipes out trees and vegetation, it also kills animals and pollutes lakes and rivers with ash. Travelers who carelessly burn trash or toss unwanted torches into the brush are a common source of fires. While lightning strikes are a primary cause of forest fires, some fires are intentionally set by enemies. Rangers occupying forests or other territories susceptible to fire constantly watch for smoke. Tall mountains make the best vantage point, but where mountains are unavailable or where scaling them frequently is impractical, rangers may construct lookout towers--simple platforms supported by long poles and nearby trees. A rope or wood ladder gives the ranger access to the tower. Fighting fires isn't easy, nor is it something one ranger can effectively do alone. Because fires spread so rapidly, particularly in dry seasons, a ranger's chance of stopping a fire decreases with every moment it's allowed to burn. Water or dirt can be used to smother small fires. If a ranger has prepared for help beforehand, he can coordinate the building of a fireline--an area cleared of all vegetation and other combustible material.This helps contain larger fires, but an adequate fireline usually requires the efforts of many individuals working as a team. Once a fire is extinguished, a close watch must still be kept for many days, lest a smoldering limb start the fire blazing once again.
  • Flood. An excess of precipitation, sudden snowmelt, or high winds producing strong coastal waves may result in flooding. Floods can wash away valuable topsoil, destroy trees and buildings, and drown the unprepared. Rangers reduce the severity of river flooding by planting and maintaining the trees and grasses in elevated lands. This vegetation controls runoff and absorbs melted snow, preventing it from running off into rivers and causing the water to rise over the embankments. Ambitious rangers with leadership skills will sometimes coordinate the local population to assist him building levees to contain rivers prone to flooding. This must be handled with care, as such rivers can silt up, causing worse problems later. Seacoast floods, on the other hand, are almost impossible to prevent. A ranger's best strategy for dealing with them is to become familiar with the weather patterns that precede them. With sufficient warning, a ranger can warn others to seek protection in the highlands until the storm subsides.
  • Insects/Disease. Infestations of beetles, locusts, aphids, and other insects can strip forests and pastures in a matter of days or weeks. Molds and rusts can ravage woodlands if unchecked. Old trees, which aren't as resistant to disease as younger ones, are particularly vulnerable. To prevent the spread of destructive insects and fungi, rangers remove and dispose of infested plants as quickly as possible.

Law Enforcement

Certain rangers, such as Wardens and Sea Rangers, may be charged with enforcing the laws of the local ruler. They arrest and punish poachers, patrol the lands they guard, and sometimes negotiate land use agreements with farmers, loggers, and others. If a royal decree protects a particular animal species, the ranger may be charged with enforcing it. Some rangers have the authority to act as judge and jury, allowing them to try cases on the spot and pass sentences as they see fit. Fines may be levied for minor infractions, such as trespassing, while more severe crimes, such as killing an animal from the king's private stock or picking fruit from the king's tree, may be punishable by death. In such cases, the ranger will have a charter or royal writ from the ruler.

Foregatherings

Though they generally avoid organizations and communal events, many rangers participate in informal get-togethers called forgatherings or moots. At forgatherings, rangers can exchange ideas, barter for supplies, and participate in contests of skill, as well as catch up on gossip and blow off steam. Attendance at forgatherings is by no means mandatory, but most rangers look forward to the opportunity to spend a few days socializing with others who share the same general philosophy and professional challenges. These are often times of much merriment and celebration. Old friends are greeted warmly and new rangers are initiated, sometimes with raucous practical joking. There are food and fun for all, and tests of skill and prowess to pass the time and take each other's measure.

Attending a Forgathering

A ranger can go through his entire life without ever hearing about a forgathering, let alone attending one. But chances are that sooner or later, he'll hear a rumor about an upcoming forgathering, or receive an invitation from another ranger. He may also notice strange symbols etched on trees or stones, intended as guideposts to lead attendees to the forgathering site (depending on how secret is the location of the meeting, a ranger might need the trail sign proficiency to translate the symbols). In most cases, forgathering attendance requires no prior arrangements. These gatherings are by their nature informal, and they are rarely interrupted by serious business except under the most unusual circumstances. Any ranger who shows up is usually welcome; rangers who bring extra meat, fruit, or wine to share are welcomed with open arms. Attendees are expected to supply their own bedding, tents, and food. First-timers may be required to perform extra chores, such as guard duty or trash disposal. A ranger may bring non-ranger companions with him as guests, providing the guests keep to themselves and stay out of the way. The ranger is responsible for his guests' behavior; should they cause trouble or make nuisances of themselves, both the ranger and his guests will be summarily ejected. It's unlikely that ranger will be welcome at any future forgatherings unless things are smoothed over.

Types, Sites, and Dates

There are as many types of forgatherings as there are rangers. Some are held in well-traveled forests, others in remote deserts. Some attract only specific kit types, such as Mountain Men or Sea Rangers, while others are primarily intended for specific races, such as elves. In general, however, most forgatherings are open to any ranger who cares to come. Though some established forgatherings occasionally change locations and dates, most are held in the same place and at the same time every year for the convenience of the attendees. Any open wilderness area, reasonably isolated, can serve as a forgathering site. Forests, mountains, and plains are preferred, as they give the easiest access to the greatest number of rangers. Because travel can be difficult in the winter, and summer can bring uncomfortably hot temperatures, forgatherings are usually held in late spring or early fall. Most forgatherings last from two to three days, but some drag on for several weeks or until the last few diehards call it quits and head for home. Specifics about individual forgatherings are hard to come by, since rangers tend to keep the details to themselves.

Activities and Events

As forgatherings are primarily intended as social events, rarely are there fixed agendas or schedules. Activities tend to develop spontaneously, continue as long as the rangers show an interest, and end when the participants have had enough. Following are a few of the activities and events most likely to occur:
  • Trading
Trading goes on virtually non-stop at most forgatherings, ranging from private transactions between individuals to dozens of rangers peddling their wares in what amounts to an open air market. Merchandise includes both the common (rope, saddles, boots) and the unusual (chainlink leashes, camouflage paint, homemade wine). Weapons and maps are especially in demand, particularly bows and quarterstaves with hand-carved designs, and maps of exotic territories that detail the newest trails. Rangers pay for their purchases in fur, food, and trinkets as well as gold pieces. Magical items are occasionally available, but many rangers are more inclined to loan them to needy comrades rather than sell them outright. Rangers who borrow magical items are expected to return them at the next forgathering. Being men and women of integrity, the borrowers rarely fail to honor their agreements.
  • News and Gossip
Information flows freely at forgatherings, and most rangers are eager to learn about the trials and tribulations their comrades have experienced in the previous year. They hear of marriages, births, and deaths, as well as followers acquired and abandoned. They learn which expeditions resulted in new discoveries and which ended in disaster. Rumors abound of lost civilizations, hidden treasures, and gruesome monsters. An attentive ranger may hear about employment opportunities or new hunting grounds. If he's lucky, an unattached ranger may make contact with a potential mate.
  • Training
The typical forgathering attracts rangers with a wide range of skills. Often, they're willing to give instruction to novices for a small fee or as a gesture of friendship. If he locates a willing teacher, a ranger may be able to pick up hunting or tracking tips, acquire cooking secrets from a master chef, or learn how to construct emergency shelters from an elder woodsman.
  • Contests
No forgathering would be complete without games and contests for rangers to demonstrate their skills and compete for prizes. Conservative forgatherings feature debates, target shooting, and knotting matches (where contestants see who can untangle complex knots in the shortest time). The Glass Eye Concourse and similarly rowdy forgatherings feature contests of a more physical nature, such as head-slamming (contestants butt heads as hard as they can until one passes out), dagger juggling (often done blindfolded), and bear wrestling. Mountain Men in particular have a tradition of rather intense competition. For example, Mountain Men enjoy a bizarre drinking contest where bitter roots, fish scales, rotten vegetables, and other distasteful substances are mixed with water; whoever consumes the most of this vile brew is declared the winner. Other contests common to orgatherings include horse races, rabbit hunts, and mock battles using swords and spears bound with thick layers of cloth. Winners are awarded silver pendants, hiking boots, or other prizes donated by the more affluent attendees. If donations aren't available, each participant puts a few coins in a pot before a contest begins; whoever wins claims the pot. Wagering is rampant for all types of contests, with rangers betting everything from animal pelts and dried meat, to arrowheads and leather gloves.

GATHER UP SOME GOOD OL' BOYS AND HAVE A BALL OUT THERE IN THE WILD!

submitted by famoushippopotamus to DnDBehindTheScreen

Windows 7 Installation Issue Regarding Dependencies

Tried all of the most recent versions, all running under admin. No antivirus software running concurrently. Here is the log I get:
18-4-23 22:37:58.9|Info|Bootstrap|Starting Radarr - C:\ProgramData\Radarr\bin\Radarr.exe - Version 0.2.0.1067
18-4-23 22:37:59.9|Info|Router|Application mode: Interactive
18-4-23 22:38:00.1|Info|MigrationLogger|*** Migrating data source=C:\ProgramData\Radarr\nzbdrone.db;cache size=-10485760;datetimekind=Utc;journal mode=Wal;pooling=True;version=3 ***
18-4-23 22:38:00.3|Info|MigrationLogger|*** Migrating data source=C:\ProgramData\Radarr\logs.db;cache size=-10485760;datetimekind=Utc;journal mode=Wal;pooling=True;version=3 ***
18-4-23 22:38:00.3|Info|OwinHostController|Listening on the following URLs:
18-4-23 22:38:00.3|Info|OwinHostController| http://*:7878/
18-4-23 22:38:00.5|Info|NancyBootstrapper|Starting NzbDrone API
18-4-23 22:38:00.6|Fatal|WindowsApp|EPIC FAIL: Something went wrong when trying to satisfy one of the dependencies during composition, make sure that you've registered all new dependencies in the container and inspect the innerexception for more details.
[v0.2.0.1067] System.InvalidOperationException: Something went wrong when trying to satisfy one of the dependencies during composition, make sure that you've registered all new dependencies in the container and inspect the innerexception for more details. - TinyIoC.TinyIoCResolutionException: Unable to resolve type: Nancy.NancyEngine - TinyIoC.TinyIoCResolutionException: Unable to resolve type: Nancy.Routing.DefaultRequestDispatcher - TinyIoC.TinyIoCResolutionException: Unable to resolve type: Nancy.Routing.DefaultRouteResolver - TinyIoC.TinyIoCResolutionException: Unable to resolve type: Nancy.Routing.RouteCache - TinyIoC.TinyIoCResolutionException: Unable to resolve type: NzbDrone.Api.Wanted.MovieCutoffModule - System.IO.FileLoadException: Could not load file or assembly 'System.Core, Version=2.0.5.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=7cec85d7bea7798e, Retargetable=Yes' or one of its dependencies. The given assembly name or codebase was invalid. (Exception from HRESULT: 0x80131047)
at NzbDrone.Api.NzbDroneRestModule`1..ctor(String resource)
at NzbDrone.Api.Wanted.MovieCutoffModule..ctor(IMovieCutoffService movieCutoffService, IMovieService movieService, IQualityUpgradableSpecification
qualityUpgradableSpecification, IBroadcastSignalRMessage signalRBroadcaster) in C:\projects\radarr-usby1\src\NzbDrone.Api\Wanted\MovieCutoffModule.cs:line 17 at lambda_method(Closure , Object[] )
at TinyIoC.TinyIoCContainer.ConstructType(Type requestedType, Type implementationType, ConstructorInfo constructor, NamedParameterOverloads parameters, ResolveOptions options) in C:\projects\radarr-usby1\src\NzbDrone.Common\TinyIoC.cs:line 3560
--- End of inner exception stack trace ---
at TinyIoC.TinyIoCContainer.ConstructType(Type requestedType, Type implementationType, ConstructorInfo constructor, NamedParameterOverloads parameters, ResolveOptions options) in C:\projects\radarr-usby1\src\NzbDrone.Common\TinyIoC.cs:line 3568
at TinyIoC.TinyIoCContainer.SingletonFactory.GetObject(Type requestedType, TinyIoCContainer container, NamedParameterOverloads parameters, ResolveOptions options) in C:\projects\radarr-usby1\src\NzbDrone.Common\TinyIoC.cs:line 2738
at TinyIoC.TinyIoCContainer.ResolveInternal(TypeRegistration registration, NamedParameterOverloads parameters, ResolveOptions options) in C:\projects\radarr-usby1\src\NzbDrone.Common\TinyIoC.cs:line 3230
at TinyIoC.TinyIoCContainer.b__134_2(TypeRegistration registration) in C:\projects\radarr-usby1\src\NzbDrone.Common\TinyIoC.cs:line 3650
at System.Linq.Enumerable.WhereSelectEnumerableIterator`2.MoveNext()
at System.Linq.Enumerable.d__b1`1.MoveNext()
at Nancy.Routing.RouteCache.BuildCache(IEnumerable`1 modules)
at Nancy.Routing.RouteCache..ctor(INancyModuleCatalog moduleCatalog, INancyContextFactory contextFactory, IRouteSegmentExtractor routeSegmentExtractor, IRouteDescriptionProvider routeDescriptionProvider, ICultureService cultureService, IEnumerable`1 routeMetadataProviders)
at lambda_method(Closure , Object[] )
at TinyIoC.TinyIoCContainer.ConstructType(Type requestedType, Type implementationType, ConstructorInfo constructor, NamedParameterOverloads parameters, ResolveOptions options) in C:\projects\radarr-usby1\src\NzbDrone.Common\TinyIoC.cs:line 3560
--- End of inner exception stack trace ---
at TinyIoC.TinyIoCContainer.ConstructType(Type requestedType, Type implementationType, ConstructorInfo constructor, NamedParameterOverloads parameters, ResolveOptions options) in C:\projects\radarr-usby1\src\NzbDrone.Common\TinyIoC.cs:line 3568
at TinyIoC.TinyIoCContainer.SingletonFactory.GetObject(Type requestedType, TinyIoCContainer container, NamedParameterOverloads parameters, ResolveOptions options) in C:\projects\radarr-usby1\src\NzbDrone.Common\TinyIoC.cs:line 2738
at TinyIoC.TinyIoCContainer.ResolveInternal(TypeRegistration registration, NamedParameterOverloads parameters, ResolveOptions options) in C:\projects\radarr-usby1\src\NzbDrone.Common\TinyIoC.cs:line 3230
at TinyIoC.TinyIoCContainer.ConstructType(Type requestedType, Type implementationType, ConstructorInfo constructor, NamedParameterOverloads parameters, ResolveOptions options) in C:\projects\radarr-usby1\src\NzbDrone.Common\TinyIoC.cs:line 3536
--- End of inner exception stack trace ---
at TinyIoC.TinyIoCContainer.ConstructType(Type requestedType, Type implementationType, ConstructorInfo constructor, NamedParameterOverloads parameters, ResolveOptions options) in C:\projects\radarr-usby1\src\NzbDrone.Common\TinyIoC.cs:line 3549
at TinyIoC.TinyIoCContainer.SingletonFactory.GetObject(Type requestedType, TinyIoCContainer container, NamedParameterOverloads parameters, ResolveOptions options) in C:\projects\radarr-usby1\src\NzbDrone.Common\TinyIoC.cs:line 2738
at TinyIoC.TinyIoCContainer.ResolveInternal(TypeRegistration registration, NamedParameterOverloads parameters, ResolveOptions options) in C:\projects\radarr-usby1\src\NzbDrone.Common\TinyIoC.cs:line 3230
at TinyIoC.TinyIoCContainer.ConstructType(Type requestedType, Type implementationType, ConstructorInfo constructor, NamedParameterOverloads parameters, ResolveOptions options) in C:\projects\radarr-usby1\src\NzbDrone.Common\TinyIoC.cs:line 3536
--- End of inner exception stack trace ---
at TinyIoC.TinyIoCContainer.ConstructType(Type requestedType, Type implementationType, ConstructorInfo constructor, NamedParameterOverloads parameters, ResolveOptions options) in C:\projects\radarr-usby1\src\NzbDrone.Common\TinyIoC.cs:line 3549
at TinyIoC.TinyIoCContainer.SingletonFactory.GetObject(Type requestedType, TinyIoCContainer container, NamedParameterOverloads parameters, ResolveOptions options) in C:\projects\radarr-usby1\src\NzbDrone.Common\TinyIoC.cs:line 2738
at TinyIoC.TinyIoCContainer.ResolveInternal(TypeRegistration registration, NamedParameterOverloads parameters, ResolveOptions options) in C:\projects\radarr-usby1\src\NzbDrone.Common\TinyIoC.cs:line 3230
at TinyIoC.TinyIoCContainer.ConstructType(Type requestedType, Type implementationType, ConstructorInfo constructor, NamedParameterOverloads parameters, ResolveOptions options) in C:\projects\radarr-usby1\src\NzbDrone.Common\TinyIoC.cs:line 3536
--- End of inner exception stack trace ---
at TinyIoC.TinyIoCContainer.ConstructType(Type requestedType, Type implementationType, ConstructorInfo constructor, NamedParameterOverloads parameters, ResolveOptions options) in C:\projects\radarr-usby1\src\NzbDrone.Common\TinyIoC.cs:line 3549
at TinyIoC.TinyIoCContainer.SingletonFactory.GetObject(Type requestedType, TinyIoCContainer container, NamedParameterOverloads parameters, ResolveOptions options) in C:\projects\radarr-usby1\src\NzbDrone.Common\TinyIoC.cs:line 2738
at TinyIoC.TinyIoCContainer.ResolveInternal(TypeRegistration registration, NamedParameterOverloads parameters, ResolveOptions options) in C:\projects\radarr-usby1\src\NzbDrone.Common\TinyIoC.cs:line 3230
at TinyIoC.TinyIoCContainer.Resolve(Type resolveType) in C:\projects\radarr-usby1\src\NzbDrone.Common\TinyIoC.cs:line 1429
at TinyIoC.TinyIoCContainer.Resolve[ResolveType]() in C:\projects\radarr-usby1\src\NzbDrone.Common\TinyIoC.cs:line 1548
at NzbDrone.Api.TinyIoCNancyBootstrapper.GetEngineInternal() in C:\projects\radarr-usby1\src\NzbDrone.Api\TinyIoCNancyBootstrapper.cs:line 52
at Nancy.Bootstrapper.NancyBootstrapperBase`1.SafeGetNancyEngineInstance()
--- End of inner exception stack trace ---
at Nancy.Bootstrapper.NancyBootstrapperBase`1.SafeGetNancyEngineInstance()
at Nancy.Bootstrapper.NancyBootstrapperBase`1.GetEngine()
at Nancy.Owin.NancyMiddleware.UseNancy(NancyOptions options)
at Owin.AppBuilderExtensions.UseNancy(IAppBuilder builder, NancyOptions options)
at Radarr.Host.Owin.MiddleWare.NancyMiddleWare.Attach(IAppBuilder appBuilder) in C:\projects\radarr-usby1\src\NzbDrone.Host\Owin\MiddleWare\NancyMiddleWare.cs:line 20
at Radarr.Host.Owin.OwinAppFactory.BuildApp(IAppBuilder appBuilder) in C:\projects\radarr-usby1\src\NzbDrone.Host\Owin\OwinServiceProvider.cs:line 78
at Microsoft.Owin.Hosting.Engine.HostingEngine.ResolveApp(StartContext context)
at Microsoft.Owin.Hosting.Engine.HostingEngine.Start(StartContext context)
at Radarr.Host.Owin.OwinAppFactory.CreateApp(List`1 urls) in C:\projects\radarr-usby1\src\NzbDrone.Host\Owin\OwinServiceProvider.cs:line 52
at Radarr.Host.Owin.OwinHostController.StartServer() in C:\projects\radarr-usby1\src\NzbDrone.Host\Owin\OwinHostController.cs:line 53
at Radarr.Host.NzbDroneServiceFactory.Start() in C:\projects\radarr-usby1\src\NzbDrone.Host\ApplicationServer.cs:line 63
at Radarr.Host.Router.Route(ApplicationModes applicationModes) in C:\projects\radarr-usby1\src\NzbDrone.Host\Router.cs:line 38
at Radarr.Host.Bootstrap.Start(ApplicationModes applicationModes, StartupContext startupContext) in C:\projects\radarr-usby1\src\NzbDrone.Host\Bootstrap.cs:line 73
at Radarr.Host.Bootstrap.Start(StartupContext startupContext, IUserAlert userAlert, Action`1 startCallback) in C:\projects\radarr-usby1\src\NzbDrone.Host\Bootstrap.cs:line 39
at NzbDrone.WindowsApp.Main(String[] args) in C:\projects\radarr-usby1\src\NzbDrone\WindowsApp.cs:line 23
submitted by OilofOregano to radarr